Sunny Deo - Knee Surgeon Swindon, Keyhole Knee Surgery & Sports Clinic

Bursae & Cysts

Bursae & Cysts

Low level knee bursae
The knee joint is surrounded by two major bursae or spaces. These are structures that allow soft tissues to glide over a given joint and are lined with specialised tissue to joint lining (synovium). At the tip of the knee, over the kneecap bone, is the prepatellar bursa, just below is the infratellar bursa. This bursa can become inflamed (prepatellar bursitis) from direct trauma to the front of the knee. This commonly occurs when maintaining a prolonged kneeling position. It has been referred to as "housemaid's knee," "roofer's knee," and "carpet layer's knee," based on the patient's associated occupational histories. It can lead to varying degrees of swelling, warmth, tenderness, and redness in the overlying area of the knee. As compared with knee joint inflammation (arthritis), it is usually only mildly painful. It is usually associated with significant pain when kneeling but can cause stiffness and pain with walking. Also, in contrast to problems within the knee joint, the range of motion of the knee is frequently preserved or there is locking or giving way.

Acute Prepatellar bursitis can occur when the bursa fills with blood from injury. Far more commonly, it it is chronic or acutely chronic as noted above. It can also be seen in rheumatoid arthritis and can occur from deposits of crystals, as seen in patients with gouty arthritis and pseudogout. The prepatellar bursa can also become infected with bacteria (septic bursitis). When this happens, fever may be present. This type of infection usually occurs from breaks in the overlying skin or puncture wounds. The bacteria involved in septic bursitis of the knee are usually those that normally cover the skin, called staphylococcus. Rarely, a chronically inflamed bursa can become infected by bacteria traveling through the blood. The infrapatellar bursa lies over the lower part of the patellar tendon and the top of leg bone (tibia)

Knee cysts
Cysts can occur in many shapes and forms around the knee. A cyst is defined as a closed cavity, or sac, that is lined with synovium. It can contain liquid (synovial fluid) or semisolid material and can occur in soft tissue or in bone. Benign or malignant masses must be distinguished from cystic lesions. The vast majority are benign and are bulges from the back of the joint called Bakers Cysts, or arising from the cartilages (Meniscal Cysts).
Knee Biomechanics
Knee Anatomy
Knee Conditions
Arthritis
Trauma
Bursae & Cysts
Tendinopathies
Cartilage (meniscal) & joint surface tears
Knee Treatments
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